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The Art of Financial Statement Analysis in Metal, Steel, and Manufacturing Business: The Top Secrets

Watch my one-hour training below on how to lead your people by knowing your financials.

Reading and understanding financial statements are essential for any business owner or manager.


Financial statements provide a snapshot of a company's financial position at a specific time and give insight into its past performance.


They include the balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of stockholders' equity.


This article will explore some of the secrets to knowing how to read financial statements and provide examples to illustrate each point.


1. Understand the purpose of each financial statement.


Understanding the purpose of each financial statement and how it fits into the company's overall financial picture is essential.


The balance sheet shows a company's financial position at a specific time, including its assets, liabilities, and equity. It provides a snapshot of the company's financial health and can be used to assess its solvency and ability to pay its debts.


The income statement shows a company's revenues and expenses over a specific period, usually a month or a year. It is used to determine the company's profitability and is known as a profit and loss statement.


The statement of cash flows shows how a company's operations, investing, and financing activities have affected its cash and cash equivalents over a specific period. It assesses a company's liquidity and ability to generate money.


The stockholders' equity statement shows the company's equity changes over a specific period. It includes information about the company's issuance and repurchase of shares and dividends paid to shareholders.


For example, let's say that a company's balance sheet shows that it has $100,000 in assets and $50,000 in liabilities. This means that the company has $50,000 in equity, representing the value of its assets minus its debts.


2. Know the critical financial ratios.


Financial ratios are calculations that help you understand a company's financial performance and position. Some common ratios include the current ratio, debt-to-equity ratio, and return on investment.


The current ratio measures a company's short-term liquidity, which is its ability to pay its debts as they come due. It is calculated by dividing a company's current assets (such as cash, accounts receivable, and inventory) by its current liabilities (such as accounts payable and short-term debt). A current ratio of 1 or higher is generally considered healthy, as it indicates that the company has sufficient assets to cover its short-term obligations.


The debt-to-equity ratio measures a company's financial leverage and the extent to which it uses debt to finance its operations. It is calculated by dividing a company's total liabilities by its total equity. A debt-to-equity ratio of 1 or lower is generally considered healthy, as it indicates that the company is not heavily reliant on debt to finance its operations.


Return on investment (ROI) measures a company's profitability and efficiency. It is calculated by dividing a company's net income by its total assets. A high ROI indicates that the company generates many profits relative to its assets, while a low ROI suggests the opposite.


For example, let's say that a company has $50,000 in current assets and $25,000 in current liabilities. Its current ratio would be 2 ($50,000/$25,000), which indicates that it has sufficient assets to cover its short-term debts.


3. Understand the difference between cash flow and profits.


While profits are significant, they do not accurately reflect a company's financial health. It understands the difference between profits and cash flow and the factors that affect each.


Profit, also known as net income, is a company's total revenues minus its expenses. It measures a company's profitability and is typically reported on the income statement.


On the other hand, cash flow is the movement of cash into and out of a company. It is a measure of a company's liquidity and is typically reported on the statement of cash flows.


Several factors can affect a company's profits and cash flow, including:


  • Depreciation is allocating the cost of a long-term asset over its useful life. It is a non-cash expense, meaning it does not involve cash movement. While it can hurt profits, it does not necessarily affect cash flow.

  • Working capital is the difference between a company's current assets and liabilities. Changes in working capital can affect both profits and cash flow. For example, if a company increases its inventory, it will likely hurt profits and increase its cash flow.

  • Capital expenditures are investments in long-term assets, such as equipment or real estate. While they can positively impact profits in the long run, they can also hurt cash flow in the short term.


For example, let's say that a company has $100,000 in revenues and $50,000 in expenses, which gives it a net income of $50,000. However, the company also made a $20,000 capital expenditure during the year, which reduced its cash flow by that amount. While the company has a net income of $50,000, its cash flow is only $30,000 ($50,000 - $20,000).


4. Look for trends over time.


Financial statements should be analyzed over some time rather than in isolation. Look for trends in the financial data, such as changes in revenue, expenses, and profits, to get a better understanding of the company's financial performance.


For example, let's say that a company's revenues have been steadily increasing over the past few years while its expenses have remained relatively stable. This could indicate that the company is becoming more efficient and generating more profits.


On the other hand, if a company's expenses are increasing faster than its revenues, it could be a sign that it is becoming less efficient and generating lower profits.


5. Seek guidance from a financial professional if needed.


If you are unsure how to interpret financial statements or want a second opinion, consider seeking guidance from a financial professional, such as a financial advisor or accountant. These professionals have the expertise and knowledge to help you understand your company's financial health and provide guidance on improving it.


In conclusion


Knowing how to read financial statements is essential for any business owner or manager.


It allows you to understand your company's financial position, identify trends and areas of strength and weakness, and make informed decisions about pricing, cost management, and resource allocation.


By understanding the purpose of each financial statement, knowing the key financial ratios, understanding the difference between cash flow and profits, looking for trends over time, and seeking guidance from a financial professional, you can gain a deep understanding of your company's financial health and position yourself for success.


Are you tired of feeling lost when reading and understanding financial statements? Our comprehensive financial statement analysis course will give you the skills and knowledge to confidently analyze your company's financial health and make more informed business decisions. Click the link below to learn more and start your journey to financial mastery today.


Visit our training course https://sellingworx.com/financial-training/. We also have a significant discount available if you call me @ +1-613-813-3529 or email me and ask for it at greg@metalmergercorp.com.

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